Planning Course Feedback

Hi There!

With the launch of Prepper Website NET, I am looking at creating a course for preppers on preparedness planning.

Throughout the years, this is one of the most asked questions that I receive, “I know I need to prep, but where do I start.”

I’ve learned a lot throughout my years of preparedness.  I’ve made mistakes and wished that I would have done things differently.  Some of these mistakes have cost money and some have cost time.  Coupled with my experience and all the articles I’ve shared on Prepper Website and the podcast, I feel I can help preppers focus their planning and make good decisions.

However, I know that there are many in the preparedness community with great ideas and experiences too.  I would love to get your help in creating this course.  If you would be so kind, would you share your answers to these questions in the comments below?

  • What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?
  • What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most?
  • What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey?
  • What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now?

 

Thanks in advance for sharing your answers below.  And thanks for being part of the Prepper Website Community!

Peace,
Todd

 

 

40 thoughts on “Planning Course Feedback”

  1. Americans need to completely rethink the so called analogue era versus the entire false digital super control era. Start with strong stable young men and women-look at 308 cal.rifle/carbines and 10 mm semi auto handuns like the fabulous ria-armscor out of the philipines / Pahrump Nevada.—Get a King James Bible -make sure you reexamine every hidden medical treatment you and your family-friends can find-not only parazappers-plus-restudy the former us.constitution and look at the invasion of Europe and America and who is funding it and network.Network. Network.Make sure you access like minded community .Anyone-everyone who can should study medicine and find the ways to retain the bes t of the pre-internet era.Strive to live a Moral Life with Dignity .*Molon Labe.Shall Not Be Infringed.Hunting with wisdom and ethics is excellent .No one promised any free Man a free Lunch all the time.

  2. First, know what the threats are and specifically the ones closest to your home. Once you know the threats, you can begin to formulate how to respond to the threat should something happen. Next, what are the basics you need (food, water, medications, first aid, protection) and how will you pay for them?

  3. “What should every Prepper know?” is in itself an overwhelming concept. Of course the answer is: everything! lol The best place to start is to assess where one is at the moment, basic skills: medical, defense, supplies, mechanical, transportation, etc., for everyday life. Then you can progress to any probable scenario and what you would want or need in those situations. I guess too many people are struggling with just everyday life, to make ends meet. Finances are usually the prohibitive and discouraging factor in any extreme prepping plan, forget any fancy bug-out location. Those fortunate to be able to go that route have a totally different mindset than the average Prepper, as well as their own set of challenges. Probably the most important factor is the mental, all things being equal physically. God have mercy on us all if it ever comes to actual WROL, SHTF, or TEOTWAWKI.

  4. Well since this is a basic starting point I believe that water, food and shelter should be addressed first and foremost, due to the fact that whatever happens No Matter what, be it a natural disaster, EMP, Local black out, you need to be prepared for the first 2 – 3 weeks to start. I look at as a Very long camping trip in the wild. My hardest supply to get to is food, though I grow my own and then some saving or buying long term food is hard for me. First aid is also very important, Doom and bloom have great info, And always Protection long guns hand guns and ammo from 22 cal to 308 they all work. then make a plan how and when to shelter in place, how to move if you have to the essentials. and the list goes on………….and on…….I like to Keep it simple silly….and on

  5. I’ve been trying to do the preparedness thing for many years now, have attended and put on preparedness fairs in the community, led a preparedness group, and am my current church “prep rep”. I’ve developed sort of a”eat the elephant one bite at a time” deal. Finding like minded people is crucial, ones you can trust – if you attend a church, that can be a good place – local meetup groups can be but need to be a little more careful there – Step one is, gather a 3 month supply of the non-perishable foods your family eats readily – canned soups, chili, boxes of mac and cheese (throw some butter in the freezer!), canned fruits and veggies. You can just buy a few “extra” of those items each time you go to the store. And I pick up cases of bottled water whenever I pass them on sale. Once that is done, get a good list of OTC meds/first aid supplies you need, and work on those. Then I have a yearly preparedness plan I share with people – each month is one area to focus on with your family. One month is bug out bags; one is first aid; one is long term food storage; one is communications; you throw in personal defense, transporation, etc. As you go, you learn more and more; each year you add layers to your plan based on what you’ve learned. I suppose the most important principle of preparedness that it took me a while to pick up on, is that skills are more important than stuff. Learn how to do things!! Learn how to grow food, don’t just toss an emergency seed bank on the shelf and think you’re good in a crisis – do it today! Take first aid, trauma med classes and training. Train with your weapon of choice, get the very best training you can. Learn how to fix things; mechanical, clothing, you name it. Learn all the off grid skills you can – solar oven cooking, campfire cooking, dehydrating, canning, etc. There are so many great places online that offer free info – solar oven store that has webinars on cooking in one; Marjory Wildcraft has tons of great gardening and food production and preparedness info all the time; learn, learn, learn!!

  6. I’ve been trying to do the preparedness thing for many years now, have attended and put on preparedness fairs in the community, led a preparedness group, and am my current church “prep rep”. I’ve developed sort of a”eat the elephant one bite at a time” deal. Finding like minded people is crucial, ones you can trust – if you attend a church, that can be a good place – local meetup groups can be but need to be a little more careful there – Step one is, gather a 3 month supply of the non-perishable foods your family eats readily – canned soups, chili, boxes of mac and cheese (throw some butter in the freezer!), canned fruits and veggies. You can just buy a few “extra” of those items each time you go to the store. And I pick up cases of bottled water whenever I pass them on sale. Once that is done, get a good list of OTC meds/first aid supplies you need, and work on those. Then I have a yearly preparedness plan I share with people – each month is one area to focus on with your family. One month is bug out bags; one is first aid; one is long term food storage; one is communications; you throw in personal defense, transporation, etc. As you go, you learn more and more; each year you add layers to your plan based on what you’ve learned. I suppose the most important principle of preparedness that it took me a while to pick up on, is that skills are more important than stuff. Learn how to do things!! Learn how to grow food, don’t just toss an emergency seed bank on the shelf and think you’re good in a crisis – do it today! Take first aid, trauma med classes and training. Train with your weapon of choice, get the very best training you can. Learn how to fix things; mechanical, clothing, you name it. Learn all the off grid skills you can – solar oven cooking, campfire cooking, dehydrating, canning, etc. There are so many great places online that offer free info – solar oven store that has webinars on cooking in one; Marjory Wildcraft has tons of great gardening and food production and preparedness info all the time; learn, learn, learn!!

    1. Mike’s comment about neighbors is VERY IMPORTANT. Add to that immediate family and friends…. One can’t do all that is necessary alone. It doesn’t help that some in the main stream media think we’re crazy.

  7. What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?
    To be aware of that shit can happend, not just walking around in the feelgood bubble.

    What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most?
    Lack of knowledge, storage space and economics.

    What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey?
    Early I was in the feelgood bubble, I wish I would have been more aware earlier.

    What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now?
    Money

    1. The hardest part for me was getting like minded people. Got most of my family on board by camping. Scouting when younger. Even camping in the back yard can teach family many skills and they do not even know they are learning. You can not over whelm them. Scares them off. Getting outside family recruits is much more difficult. I am not good at that yet.

  8. I think the issue of how the elcerly need to prepare for crisis. Many are experiencing a decline in health. Many have downsized to new housing situations and have gotten rid of a lit of things due to no place to store them. In a time of having to run for our lives, how does someone with age do that? I am seventy years old. No doubt, I will probably not bug out. I am a fighter, but I am not going to lie on the ground in a tent somewhere. I am feeling too old for that! I suggest you put together a bug in/bug out list for my age bracket. Don’t forget to address the issue of our children thinking we have gone senile because we are prepping. It is hard to raise adult children! Thank-you.

  9. “What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?”

    I think you need to know the reason you are prepping. You need to know the issues for which you are prepping, so it means having purpose, and a plan. Know the immediate threats in your areas and prep for those things. Know if you are going to hunker down or if your threat will require you to relocate and how you will plan to make that happen.

    “What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most?”

    Making the most of out a small space, like an apartment. Some people have large homes and big basements they can turn into amazing storage facilities. I do not have that advantage at this time. So, I struggle to find creative ways to store water, food, hygiene, self-defense medical/first aid/sanitation supplies in a smaller place.

    “What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey?”

    I think I am relatively early in my preparedness journey, so I guess I don’t how to answer that question except I know that every journey has potholes and it would be handy to right now to know the rookie mistakes others are aware of. I am a teachable person and I listen to other’s experience and wisdom.

    “What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now?”

    Knowing skills that I will need to supplement storing food and stuff. I am talking about survival skills. Not necessarily wilderness skills, but more related to skills you need in regard to hunkering down, what some call, “bugging in.”

  10. What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?
    a. First do a threat assessment of your area. For instance, are you near a railroad track with high volume of traffic? They carry a lot of chemicals. How close are you to a major highway? You should be off a road, off a road, off a road. In other words, off of a major highway, off of a secondary road, off of a branch from the secondary road and removed from sight. What industry is near you that could produce a problem? Review the crime incidents reports to locate the trouble spots.
    b. Weather trends for your area. Are you prone to flooding? What type and severity of storms are prone to your area? Do you need a shelter? Do you need a secondary source of heat or cooling which does not require power?
    c. Do you have a ready source of water OTHER THAN city water? Do you have a well? How are you going to pump water without power?
    d. If you have livestock, how will you tend to them if you do not have power? Are they protected from predators and also from looters?
    e. How are you going to protect your home from looters? Do you have on hand materials to repair storm damage? Do you have the skills and tools to repair storm damage? If not, learn.
    Do you know how to “harden” your home?
    f. Food storage
    g. Gardening
    h. Vehicle repair
    i. Have a basic usable knowledge of plumbing, electrical and carpentry. If not, learn. Not from You Tube, get the books and the tools.

  11. The hardest problem I see is what to do with friends ,family pets etc.do I come first? Or can I still survive if I have to think ,provide and carry their lode?

  12. The best way to find out what you need is to just walk to your circuit breaker box and turn the main breaker off. Start with a day and work your way to 3 or 4 days or more. You will find out real quick how little you are prepared for a disaster. Create a budget for buying preps, buying a little at a time – prepping should be done on a continual basis, not a one time shot. In a down scenario, boredom will be a major factor, especially for kids. Without power and no electronics, people will go nuts – so you will need something to keep people occupied, so it is better to plan ahead. Regardless how people feel about guns, you will need one or more. Police are great, but they will not be able to help you in a down scenario – they will be to busy dealing with the masses or helping themselves and their own families. You will need to protect yourself. People just need to start before it’s too late. Something will be better than nothing, but you will find you will never have enough.

  13. What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared? Just get started. Start with water, food, and shelter
    What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most? Organization of my supplies. Do I keep all Medical together or should I split it up in case something happens? Do we bug out or bug in?
    What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey? How to properly store food. How to get your family on board.
    What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now? Organization

  14. Ditto to everything Mama Grizzly wrote above. I have been doing the preparedness thing for over 30 years for my family and teaching in my congregation, and now through my writing.

    I would add:
    –Don’t waste time reading the lists of “25 Things To Disappear First…”, “10 Things Preppers Forget…”, “37 Uses for Alcohol”, etc. Those articles usually offer little in the way of substance.
    –Along the same lines, be wary of articles that contain affiliate links or advertisements to dozens of items. The author’s main purpose in writing is to line his pockets, not necessarily educate.
    –Learn skills. Be a jack- or jill-of-all-trades for your family’s basic needs, and learn at least one critical skill very well.
    –Be humble. Be ready to learn. Don’t assume you already know everything there is to know about a topic.
    –At the same time, don’t assume that because you read it on the internet, it must be true. Research. Do you own due diligence.

  15. What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?
    Every good course should start with a history lesson. It isn’t until recent times did we lose our resiliency and I think it might help to identify those strengths that our ancestors had and the hardships they faced to better prepare ourselves for the future planning. Also, planning process lessons could help folks too. The military structures (MDMP or MCPP) can help people focus their planning. There might be civilian methods as well that are less rigid.

    What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most?
    I have a difficult time spreading the word about being prepared to family. I want to tell everyone, but there are subtleties i haven’t mastered. My philosophy is one more person prepared is one less threat to my family. Problem is that I am a lousy recruiter for the cause.

    What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey?
    I wish I would opened my eyes to preparedness earlier. Finding your podcast help tremendously.

    What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now?
    Todd going back to doing daily podcasts. Lol. Actually, I appreciate everything you have taught me. I look forward to seeing your product.

  16. 1. What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?
    – Yourself. Know yourself. Understand your stressors and how to diminish them. Know your physical limitations and how to work with them. Everyone always says “You don’t know how you will react in a given situation” which is true, but you can have a better idea. Allow yourself opportunities to be mentally, emotionally, spiritually, and physically challenged. Take for example Army basic training. It is not only physically tough, but it challenges the mental strength of the recruit. Volunteer in a cancer ward or for hospice, challenge your emotional and spiritual strength now- when your life and the lives sof those you love do NOT depend on these strengths. KNOW YOURSELF.

    What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most?
    Taking the time out of the current world’s demand of work, home, kids, traffic to go out into nature and focus on family self-sufficiency AND getting us off the Debt-Based monetary system.

    What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey?
    Where bitcoin would go (LOL- JK):D … I wish I had known all the opportunities available to live a life that allows prep as a part of it. Park rangers, Forestry, Gumsmithing, Organic farming communities, etc. I wish I knew how to get into them then, now I’m too deep in to start fresh.

    What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now?
    Real financial advise on how to get out of the debt cycle, with real-world solutions for those of us in the working class living in EXTREMELY high cost living areas.

    PREPPING IDEAS FROM A WORKING FAMILY PREPPIER:
    – spend $10 every time you go to the grocery store on prep food (rice, beans, etc). keep them in a food-safe longterm bucket, when full, seal it up and label.
    – buy a military field manual for first aid, old ones available on Ebay, Barnes and nobles, etc. get on youtube, open the book to the first section and look for videos for whatever skill lesson you’re on. Work your way through the manual. Use military NOT civilian because it won’t be focused on pharmaceuticals and hospitals. (Chicken skin good for practicing sutures)
    – GO CAMPING!!!! Literally the best thing you can do (and cheapest) is to get your family out of the modern world and comfortable to be without the amenities.
    LESSONS YOU LEARN CAMPING
    + how to cook over a fire
    + how to dress for the given weather
    + how to create a shelter
    + how to identify environmental dangers
    + how far can you walk with how heavy a load
    …..I can go on and on.

    Hope this helps 🙂 ANYTIME you are looking for some help, I’m here and will help if I can.

  17. “The best way to find out what you need is to just walk to your circuit breaker box and turn the main breaker off.” BEST ADVISE EVER!!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

  18. Prepping can be so overwhelming. For the first year I felt like I was running in place and, being broke, not getting anywhere. What really helped was 1. Skills, and 2. Financial awareness. I was vulnerable financially and didn’t understand what a huge problem that could be, especially if the disaster turns out to be a slow-moving crisis. At the same time, I was learning to garden, preserve food and other old-timey skills. Once I understood where all my money was going and how to stop, or at least slow it down, I felt like I had control of everything else and could make good prepping decisions. Every one of Todd’s podcast episodes on the subject was important! Although the first-year freak out is normal for preppers, it is so important to work on what you can. The experts tell you to start slowly, and they aren’t wrong about that. Though we all want to make up for lost time, sometimes it takes a while to realize you are your own best asset. Situational awareness starts at home.

  19. All excellent comments above and it’s hard to add additional suggestions. I would start with the 3 most likely issues to effect your area and you. That’s your “Bull’s Eye” or 10 Ring, Completely prepare for that. Then decide what are the next 3 major issues are (your 9 Ring) and completely prepare for those etc. etc. There will be common prep areas: communications, medical, food, sanitation, etc., put extra emphasis on those areas. The best way to become an expert is to teach others. When you become competent in an area teach someone else: family, friends, community class, you will always need backup! Well, that’s just my .02 cents and over priced at that!

  20. What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?

    Adding these thoughts to all the good ones above:

    First thing to learn is several ways to make water usable and obtain the products to do so.

    Then learn how to live with less so you have more money for other things to stock/learn. (Not all training is free)

    Then research “expiration dates”. (Cuz they are random numbers in many cases)

    What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most?

    Rotation. I prep for a family (who will show up if the SHTF) but they aren’t here to eat regularly so my stocks expire faster than I can eat (and still fit in my clothing) I am now concentrating on long term food so it won’t expire for 25 YEARS…that’ll give me a fighting chance at keeping up on rotation. LOL

    What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey?

    How very important record keeping is. Oh my, if I only knew and it is just about impossible to recreate the records I should have kept of my “collections” Please stress how important a central location of lists of supplies and information is. IF I die first no one in my group knows where the ax is or the extra seeds. For that matter they don’t know there ARE extra seeds and an ax. Since there is no way I can inventory my stocks now, they best keep me healthy. LOL Stress, strongly, that they need to find a system that works well for them and keep it up daily. (Daily it only takes 10 minutes before bed, weekly it would take an hour, any longer than that you have forgotten 1/3 of what you obtained so it doesn’t exist in the event of your death…which means your family will be deprived of those items.)

    What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now?

    Time. There is never enough time to get it all done and have a nice life. And that is what everyone just starting out needs to remember … You need to live now, not just prepare for the future…you know, just in case the S DOESN”T HTF in their lifetime.

  21. I suppose I would say the area I feel like I need help in is actually getting started and not just thinking about it. With 2 dogs, a cat and a husband I get overwhelmed when I think about everything I would need to get ready so instead I stall. I think it’s called analysis paralysis, so a step by step guide would be helpful. Most resources just throw so much information at you and hundreds of items to consider for each situation I have no idea what to actually invest my money in or what’s needed versus wanted.

  22. Be Organized! Once you’ve listened to your 1st 10 or 20 podcast(PrepperWebsite being the first of course!) and have read articles, books, etc., write your plan. Set aside 1 hr a day, 1 day a week, or whatever you have time for and work your plan, one subject at a time. Most will start with their bug out bag or get home bag, but water should be at the top
    Learn all you can about filtering, purification, and obtainment. Then tackle your next subject. Keep doing this and you will have learned skills and accumulated supplies that will surprise you.

  23. First, Preparedness is a lifestyle, not a “hobby”. We all advise beginning preppers to start small with the basics of food ,water and shelter. Establish a goal , for example 1 month of food and water , and work toward that goal, even if it is one can of food or one bottle of water at a time. Every skill or trade you learn , can put you one step closer to being prepared for whatever may come. Just as Todd has asked our opinions, ask questions to improve existing skills or learn new ones. Look for like minded people in your area or join a prepper group. The exchange of information and ideas can be invaluable. Finally, Listen to The Prepper Website Podcasts, Yes , all 597 of them! I’ve been prepping for many years and I always learn something new or get a different perspective on the articles he posts.

  24. Requirements differ in different parts of the world and in different seasons, so its almost impossible to prepare for everything that may happen. My belief is that if u are a little prepared, you are already ahead of 99.9 % of the population. This means situational awairness, physical preparedness, food, guns, ammo etc, as well as being fit enough to run 100 meters in 10-15 seconds to get out of the way of a threat. Remember, u dont have to be faster than the bear, only faster than the person behind u !!
    We are on a farm with our own water, electricity etc, over 50km from a town with a population of 10,000, so we intend to bug in and defend. Thats difficult in Australia as owning a firearm is a long drawn out process and the calibers are limited, no autos and semi autos only on special permits. Handguns are out as well. I have a couple of .22’s, and a .177 slug gun for fun, but I think the main weapon were is the 12 g shotgun, with adapters to fire .22, 223 etc through it. I dont think we will be facing hourds of zombies at 200 meters out here, more like honky and his stoned or drunk mates looking for trouble. Shotguns make a lot of noise and everyone knows the sound of a shell being racked in. If u are living in a city its different and maybee there will be 100’s of zombies seeking their next fix attacking you.
    Water from 200,000 l tanks and dams, plus a small seasonal creek. One thing that is often overlooked is some sort of fire fighting equipment, say a tank on a trailer, a hose and nozzell and honda firefighter pump. If the threat happens, the amount of petrol needed is small for the benifits given.
    We all have bug home bags in the vehicles, and when I have to go more that 50k from home I put a pushbike in the back of the ute. I also carry a spare (tested to work with my vehicle) computer unit and ignition bits n pieces under the seat wrapped in foil.
    I think u have to be continually looking at yr preps and looking at the season for the immediate threat to be protected against. Here it has been so dry for so long that fire is a problem now, even though its still winter, so thats the immediate threat we have planned for. That doesnt exchuse u from preparing for a storm event, emp, cme etc, but they are ‘out there’ and this is the immediate threat to be addressed.
    I feel for those who have a spouse who isnt into it and am blessed that my wife and kids can appriciate what a mess the world is in.
    As an ex electrical engineer who sold his renewable energy buisness, I could write some articles for u, but u have different standards in America than us and I dont know how relievant it would be. Our power here is 230 volts,and our 3 phase is 415 volts at 50 cycles. 110 v is non existant as its so inefficient.
    Enough from me, hi Todd.
    PS: get a flip phone, battery lasts for over a month on standby and 10 hrs talk time, then u wouldnt need to carry a power bank.

  25. RULE of 3’s. 3 minutes without Air, 3 hours without Shelter, 3 days without Water, and 3 weeks without Food helps you focus on priorities.

    Buy a good water filter. Sawyers biological filters and also their Viral gravity purifiers are back-flushable and last indefinitely. I have done the research and they can’t be beat from my perspective. All your stockpiled food won’t help if you and those you love are sick or die from contaminated water. It is hard to get our mind around not having safe water available at our faucet and bottled water WILL run out. I agree with others, just try a weekend with your electrical breakers turned off. Mind-blowing how much we depend on electricity.

    I have done a well attended seminar for the local community at our little church in AR called Essentials 4 Emergencies several times. We cover everything from Ice Storms to EMPs. Read & collected over 3000 prep articles (32 categories) from internet in the past 5 years and stored them on CDs or flash drives. There is a LOT of free and good info, available. Protect your essential electronics in a Faraday Cage. (I use a metal garbage can.) An EMP or major electrical grid failure could be a big threat. It really hard to think outside our current “box”. 2 is 1 and 1 is None. (Military term for redundancy) Have a back up for every essential item. Purchase physical books that will be essential if we are without electricity. We are bugging in. To old for the hiking/shelter bit if the cars won’t go. Really hope I am prepping for no reason but it’s better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it. I always say “If nothing happens, I am over prepared. If something DOES happen I’m under prepared. The “Normalcy Bias” is huge and most people just don’t get it. In your lifetime just because it hasn’t happened is no guarantee that it won’t happen. That is what prepping is all about. It’s a mindset.

  26. Find out about the area you’re living in and the area you’re bugging out to. Is it prone to flooding? Earthquakes? Hurricanes? Being far from high population centers is great, until you’re flooded out and you lose your home and all your seeds and food (just happened to us).

    We struggle with planning. My husband is fantastic at thinking up plans, back up plans, alternate back up plans and sub alternate back up plans. But. He isn’t very good at sharing them with me and I stink at planning! Set up a good plan, have a couple back up plans, discuss them and practice them!! Then expect the unexpected!!

    I wish I had known early on how to make soap and preserve food. Hey! What can I say? I’m female and that’s how I think! 😁

    What would help us the most to know right now is how to set up an efficient reloading set up.

  27. Soooo many product options! Regardless of the need – flashlights, water storage containers, etc. – there is literally no end to the options. My current need is mylar bags and oxygen absorbers. There are too many sizes and choices to count and ripoff artists galore! Which absorber size goes with which bag?

  28. First, I’d like to thank you for all you’ve done – for me as well as well as everyone else!

    1)shelter,fire,water
    2)weaponry
    3)decide what I was prepping for, read more 1st, inventoried what I already had and could have used until…, budgeted for how much per month – not scared and tried to buy it all at once, where to put what I bought in an organized fashion, making up a “to learn” list BEFORE a “to buy” list, prioritizing my lists
    4)time & patience – slow down and breathe – I’m doing well – just need to keep doing what I’m doing – one foot in front of the other.

  29. Hey Todd thanks for the opportunity for input:
    1. What do you believe every prepper needs to know to be prepared?
    Briefly, how to procure Shelter, Water, Food, and provide First Aid & Self-defense.
    2. What area of preparedness do you struggle in the most?
    How to: First, pay off our mortgage; esp. if the economy collapses (our pension or Social Security gets eaten up by inflation). Second, get water out of our 180-foot-deep well; if the pump fails or no electricity. Third, the ever-growing physical limitations of getting older.
    3. What do you wish you would have known early on in your preparedness journey?
    The debilitating effects of growing older. We built our retirement home as handicap accessible and glad we did, but still can’t get around as easily as we would like.
    4. What do you feel would help you the most in your preparedness journey right now?
    Answers or “Hacks” to # 2 above.

  30. Being prepared for any kind of disaster is difficult so I recommend becoming generally prepared. Long term food storage is important but acquiring the skills to maintain inventory of stored goods is vital. Begin with a small garden and learn how to preserve your produce. Acquiring the needed equipment to do that is a major investment but will go a long way toward self sufficiency. Figure out how you are going to get water without the benefit of the local water department. That may mean a gutter roof system or a well. It depends on you and your own resoursfulness. Determine how you will cook food without power. Is that over an open fire or a propane system? Keep in mind your propane will eventually run out. Get some kind of food source animal; learn to house and maintain a meat food source. Learn how to butcher and process that animal. How will you defend your property, family, and resources? You can spend a lot of money figuring out what you don’t need. I am in what most people would consider the older generation. I remember life when “off the grid” was most people’s lifestyle, not a fad. Perhaps you should get to know someone in my generation who has actual experience living a sustainable lifestyle and learn without having to do it the hard way.

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